Go to the new website
Where Light Meets Dark    
Examining the evidence for rare fauna.

 
Dedicated to Steve Irwin
 
Trail Cameras
Buy trail cameras at Wildlife Monitoring
Australia's best value trail cameras!

Thylacine Sightings

Support WLMD

Sponsored links

Log In
Username

Password






Facebook All new updates are posted to my Facebook page (Open in new window)

Where Light Meets Dark
Print View |

Examining the evidence for rare Australian fauna

big_cats_cropped.jpgthylacoleo_cropped.jpgthylacine_cropped.jpgtasmanian_devil_cropped.jpgeastern_quoll_cropped.jpgnight_parrot_cropped.jpg


Eclipsazoology

04th Aug 2010 09:48 PM
I have just added some further thoughts in the comments section at the bottom of the eclipsazoology page.

White thylacine

25th Jun 2010 08:57 AM
White thylacineIs there a white Tasmanian tiger in these photographs?

I obtained these images in 2005 but have been assured they have been around for years longer.

What do you think they show?
Read More

Blue sparrow in Canada

22nd Jun 2010 10:43 AM
Blue sparrow from CanadaReaders might recall last year that 3 different bird species were reported from Australia all sporting unusual blue colouration: the Australian White Ibis, Little Corella and House Sparrow.

A reader has just sent through pics of another blue sparrow - this time from Canada.
Read More

Facebook...

19th Jun 2010 08:22 PM
Join me on Facebook!

Where am I?

25th May 2010 10:52 PM
First, pictured to the left is a new species discovery from Papua: the world's smallest macropod (or kangaroo / wallaby). This goes along with other fantastic creatures including a "pinnochio" frog (having a long nose), giant woolly rat, tree mouse, blossom bat and others.

But where am I?

In a nutshell, after filming Monster Quest in February 2009 I looked further into trail camera technology and started a business selling trail cameras to Australia, New Zealand, the UK (and others). This has proved so successful that it consumes a fair amount of time and I now have 1 member of staff assisting.

Further, I am involved in some much-needed renovations at my home which chews up what little time remains.

Throughout the 5 year life of Where Light Meets Dark I have debated whether to continue with this Newswatch column on the homepage. Don't get me wrong - I love reading nothing better in the news than new species reports and sightings of big cats and other mystery critters, and helping spread environment and conservation news. However, at the end of the day my new business venture, as well as full time work, helps pay the bills but spending time writing news posts does not.

Therefore, I have finally decided to no longer support news articles on Where Light Meets Dark. Instead, this site will focus only on what I can uniquely contribute which is new information into discussions on new species, mystery animals and the like.

At some point I hope to rebuild the site using a new back-end system but I don't see that happening any time soon. In any case, the new format for WLMD is planned to include:

* My own trek reports in search of the thylacine (Tasmanian tiger), eastern quolls and any other field work I do with trail cameras
* The Animal Tracks Library which I have started
* The interactive thylacine sightings map and global tour
* And of course, the staple: articles which examine the evidence for rare fauna

Some regular readers will know that I collaborate with Debbie Hynes who operates the website thylacoleo.com. Together we built up the mainland (Tasmanian) devils website and share insights into using trail cameras for fauna surveys.

Debbie also hosts an online discussion forum in which I take part. When I see great news like the new kangaroo species shown above, then if no-one else has already posted it, you'll find me sharing these snippets on Debbie's forum.

You can visit the forum by clicking "Thylacoleo Forum" on Debbie's site (in the menu here: http://www.thylacoleo.com/).

What about your Tassie trek?

Okay, okay - what's new on the Tassie trek front?

Regulars may know that in early 2009 Michael and I discovered a footprint which matches that expected of the Tasmanian tiger. The print was shown in the Monster Quest episode "Isle of the Lost Tiger".

My summary regarding this print is that the observable features of the print and its surrounds leads me to conclude the print best matches that expected of a large thylacine. I have to acknowledge that statistically - regardless of whether the thylacine survives or is extinct - the most likely cause of this print is that it was created by a wombat and by some remarkable co-incidence completely resembles a thylacine print.

If you take "Tigerman's" viewpoint, and begin with the premise that the thylacine is not extinct, then you would have to conclude this is a thylacine print (in my opinion).

Two early reports on the thylacine suggest the species may have been migratory. In one report a farmer stated that at the same time every year, to within a few days of the April full moon, a family of thylacines would move through his property and take the same number of sheep at the same end of the same paddock.

A second report alleges that every winter the thylacines would come down out of the mountains off one tier, then move across the valley during winter and head up into the mountains along another tier, only to come back down the first tier after summer was over.

For this reason we deployed a half dozen cameras in the vicinity of where we found this print. During that deployment I found an additional 5 interesting prints. Three were the shape of a thylacine forefoot, and 2 were the shape of a thylacine hind foot (i.e. being very long). The context was that there was a fallen branch against which a thylacine might have reared, hence producing the less common long hind foot prints.

One reader provided the excellent suggestion that a hare or rabbit may also have created this print pattern, and the smaller size of the prints (in comparison with the first print we found) supports this possibility also. Further, these 5 new prints were less distinct as the mud was even softer than for our first print.

In May 2009 we were prevented from reaching some of our cameras due to ongoing rain in Tasmania raising the levels of nearly every creek and river. I had hoped to return to collect these cameras before now, but due to it being winter, will be unable to collect them until spring at the earliest (September).

At least we were able to deploy them 2 months before the date on which we found our initial print. If that print was made by a thylacine, and if thylacines are migratory, then this camera deployment is possibly our best hope of obtaining solid evidence of the species' survival.

And so, it's not really "goodbye" from me, but yes - there will be far less frequent activity on the WLMD website. Once a few things settle down regarding work and renovations, I should be able to continue working on those areas of the site listed above.

Until then, maybe I can catch you at the thylacoleo forum?

http://www.thylacoleo.com/

Enhanced Doyle footage analysed

27th Jan 2010 10:09 AM
Comparison of Doyle animal to Fleay thylacine showing diagnostic featuresI have received an enhanced copy of the Doyle footage of an alleged thylacine, taken in South Australia in 1973.

Seven frames are compared with frames from David Fleay's 1933 footage of a thylacine. Key diagnostic features including the hind foot length, hindquarters, tail and chest depth are compared.
Read More

Suggest a Newswatch story!

youcantry: Photos of white Tasmanian tiger: http://www.wherelightmeetsdark.com/index.php?module=wiki&page=WhiteThylacine #thylacine
youcantry: Photos of white Tasmanian tiger: http://www.wherelightmeetsdark.com/index.php?module=wiki&page=WhiteThylacine #thylacine
youcantry: Found new macropod pics on the SD card Michael retrieved in Nov. Til now I'd only seen pics he mailed me. Getting keen to pull out 6 cams!
youcantry: Found new macropod pics on the SD card Michael retrieved in Nov. Til now I'd only seen pics he mailed me. Getting keen to pull out 6 cams!
youcantry: Fox evidence in #Tasmania is mounting. Thylacine survival critics say "where's the evidence for the tiger?" http://bit.ly/aOa1GL
youcantry: Fox evidence in #Tasmania is mounting. Thylacine survival critics say "where's the evidence for the tiger?" http://bit.ly/aOa1GL
youcantry: Getting edgy to pull those cameras back out of Tas. Even dreamt last night that Col Bailey rediscovered the thylacine in SW National Park!
youcantry: Getting edgy to pull those cameras back out of Tas. Even dreamt last night that Col Bailey rediscovered the thylacine in SW National Park!
youcantry: Tested car cam during trip to west Vic in Jan - great for close sightings but not for 100s metres away. Buy from Wildlife Monitoring
youcantry: Tested car cam during trip to west Vic in Jan - great for close sightings but not for 100s metres away. Buy from Wildlife Monitoring

Follow WLMD at twitter.com/youcantry

Category: Where Light Meets Dark

More Feeds


Comments
The comments are owned by the poster. We are not responsible for its content.

Sponsored links


Latest WLMD news via Twitter
Crikey!

Crikey!

Crikey! Welcome to Where Light Meets Dark!

I'm Chris Rehberg and this is me after volunteering at Australia Zoo.

On these pages you'll find Australian wildlife information, conservation information and articles which examine the evidence for rare Australian fauna like the Tasmanian tiger and others.

All news and new articles are announced here on the homepage. You can check out the rest of the site using the menu above.

Enjoy your stay!
Interactive Thylacine Sighting Map



 
a